Wednesday, May 2, 2007

Interpreter + Artistic = Better Interpreters




Jay Krieger discusses how an interpreter needs to step back and be artistic in the area that the client lacks to be a better interpreter. Jay discusses his additional efforts in describing things when interpreting for the deaf-blind. Jay continues with this example on ASL interpreters who may want to be artistic in describing sounds along with their interpreting.

12 comments:

Lisa Z said...

I am an interpreter. I always include the hearing persons attributes. For example, today, a hearing person was very sad and began to cry, but the person was sitting next to them. The person did not realize this because they were focused on me but as soon as I signed tear (I used one index finger down face from eye) the person turned to them and put their hand on their shoulder and continued to watch me. I whole heartily believe we should as interpreters add the "artistic" parts, so the person we are interpreting for feels included.

jwomick said...

yes i agreed with u. why not send to Interpeter should add with artisitc make better interpreters as deaf people feel is part of them too. that's good point i have see my interpreter at public school she always have artistic add with interpreter with TEACHER'S ATTITUDE and character make us impressive! ur videoclips is GREAT idea to suggest to add artistic more improve interpreter skills. keep up!

oh before i forget add i did have experience interpreter with deaf-blind at Florida. as he just sit alone on the couch one of his partner have to go to bathroom or something i noticed him sit alone all deaf people around and CHATTING he make me feel that he is lonely why not he join with us? so i decide sit next him and i put his hand on my hands as tell him my name and where from. he smiled and tell me his name and where from. it was years ago i forget name oh dang! anyway somehow my old friends join with us and chatting with us i interpreter with him while my friends chatting around as NORMAL! i feel so proud i did help and make him to welcome instead patient alone all time so. it's my new experience. i know it's will cause my shoulder and arms cause tired but my friend did take my place when i got worn out my arms gosh! anyway we did use artistic HE UNDERSTAND US COMPLETE he did chatting with us with his experience and answer our questions he feel part of our friend. wow it's really interesting thing to get new experience! thank for bring it up.

Joshua "Vampbat" Womick

FRED said...

Hey Jay,
I have had similar experiences such as yours. I had time to explain things that normally I see people do them "good-enough" interpreting. Often I would just elaborate further. I just feel good when I do that to a deaf blind, simply want to share the joy of "seeing" when they can't.

todos la vie said...

Isn't that called descriptive, rather than artisic? Or did you mean artistic based on the perspective of an artist interpreter? What about those interpreters who sign at concerts -wiggling their butts and flailing their arms, telling me it's the music? Geez :-)

Susan said...

I agree, agree, AGREE with you!!!

There was one interpreter, a CODA... and she included in her facial expressions the voice, feelings, etc of my hearing colleagues, and I was amazed - the other interpreters never included that part, so I don't know their personality... till this CODA interpreter came and showed in full... never realised that this colleague was the moaning type, that colleague was the skeptical type...

These info get left behind by so many interpreters.

I loved seeing how you included the details for your friend, that is a wonderful way to go about it :) :)

Thank you for sharing, that is vital information for interpreters to know about (also for deaf interpreters for deaf-blind).

Also, want to add, interpreters for deaf children in schools should include hearing peer's characters, as these kind of information is important too.

IamMine said...

I am enjoying your deaf-blind experiences and sharing with us.

Honestly, prior to your vlogs about them - I realized I acted like hearing people being nervous or afraid of approaching deaf people because they don't realize that they could just be themselves when meeting deaf people or a person for the first time.

I saw deaf-blind person for the first time but I didn't know how so I just.... :(

Now if I see one, I'm going to introduce myself! :D

Karen Mayes said...

Hmmm...

I was thinking when I was a juror for one criminal trial in Rochester, NY (for an attempted manslaughter.) The black plaintiff had a rap sheet a mile long and the defendent was just a black kid, starting college. The interpreter did a great job relaying the messages to me, with facial expressions, energitic signs, etc.

During the deliberations, we had to ask twice, for the transcript. Now, the transcript was delivered in the monotone voice with a monotone face, with a lot of deleted comments (the judge often told her to scratch the comment out, due to the colorful languuage of the plaintiff who took the stand.) But the interpreter, hmmm, signed beautifully and I saw the jurors sitting next to me watching the interpreter carefully.

After the verdict was rendered (we found the defendent inncocent), the jurors came to the interpreter and thanked her so much, and that she helped them understand the trrial better. Huh?

But it makes one wonder...

Better to have an interpreter with strong descriptive skills, or artistic flair in the court rooms? Or in the classrooms? I guess it all depends on the interpreters' style... and how we relate to them and how they help hearing people to see us as deaf people.

Dianrez said...

You've hit on a very important aspect of interpreting. Adding descriptive details, such as angry voice, shaky voice, room sounds, and other details keeps the interpreting interesting and the deaf person involved.

I have to sit through many business meetings of hearing people and the interpreter who does a flat translation word for word, without any emphasis, makes it hard for me to understand the material.

After about 40 minutes of focusing on a wooden face and steadily moving hands, things start to happen...eyes go out of focus, attention dies, eyes start to fall asleep, neck hurts, back hurts, etc. Very embarrassing! We should compliment those interpreters who add drama to their work and make sure they get more business!

Oscar the Observer said...

This reminded me when I talked to my interpreter a long time ago and we debated translator vs. interpreter. Now I think I understand why she insisted that interpreter is a better word because a great professional interpreter is one who understand from the beginning (I mean really really understand deep deep inside his/her mind) that deaf people are... well deaf! then they will tend to know to incorporate all relevant noises into his signing.

For example, one time I talked to my friend by video relay and the interpreter at one moment stretched and yawned elaborately to show what my friend sounded like! It was funny but I am thankful he did it because I knew instantly that my friend was one tired dudette!

mule4350 said...

Yeah i agree with you about artistic by DEAF-BLIND ummmm Wonderful for them

Anonymous said...

i agree with u. YOU GUYS WHO ARE ASL TEACHERS , why not take deaf blind to show hearing people how deaf can interpreter with artistic? So that hearing people would realize that they can interpreter with artistic with deaf people to be fair and feel to be part their world.

new terpy said...

Hello,
Interesting vlog! I am also an interpreter- brand new one! I have little experience to speak from but what I feel strongly about is that inflection, tone of voice, attitude, etc. should ALL be a part of the interpretation! I am sad that the content of this vlog even needed to be discussed!!!! There is SO much information given through voice and how something is said. If you have a "wooden-faced" interpreter I say give them feedback! Tell them! As an interpreter I welcome feedback and if there is something about the interpretation that is not satisfactory it absolutely should be changed.